Automobilia Posts

Casey Thornton Joins hobbyDB

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hobbyDB is glad to have Casey Thornton on board as a Catalog Editor and Outreach Specialist. His job entails reaching out to collector clubs to round up experts and participants for our project.

Casey worked previously as the Multi-Unit Manager for Human Touch and as a Genius at the Apple Store, which really comes in handy in our Mac-based office.

He collects Bows and Archery related items, as well as Books and Medieval related items. His more modern passions include restoring a 1948 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet that has been in his family since it was brand new. He is also the Subject Manager for the Lincoln section on our site.

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Motorcycles Roar Into hobbyDB Database

As our online catalog of everything collectible continues to expand, we have added a section for motorcycles… real, full-size 1:1 scale bikes, that is. This includes choppers, sport bikes, scooters, cruisers, and everything in between.

Having a comprehensive listing of motorbikes will benefit collectors of model motorcycles as well, as you will now be able to compare notes and cross reference your models with the real thing.

BMW R 1100 RS, the Ultimate Cruising Machine

BMW R 1100 RS, the Ultimate Cruising Machine

Our first motorcycle, a BMW R 1100 RS, was posted on May 1, and many have been added since. If you are an expert on motorcycles (an entire brand or just one model), start posting new models on our site today!

Boyd Coddington Custom Car Online Museum now open on hobbyDB 

Our online catalog of collectibles is now the official online home of the Boyd Coddington Custom Car Museum. We are working directly with Boyd Coddington Jr. to create a comprehensive showing of his vehicles as well as the models and other collectibles based on them.

Boyd Coddington's CadZZila on hobbyDB

Week 1: CadZZila custom coupe

Week 2: The sleek, elegant, CheZoom

Week 2: The sleek, elegant, CheZoom

We’ll add to the collection every couple of weeks, so check in often! You’ll find the first few cars listed already and their related collectibles on our portal page.

And you can contribute the museum as well…  Have a model of one of our cars we haven’t listed? Score some sweet promotional gear at a car show? Catch any amazing photos of his rides in action? Make your mark and add it to the catalog!

The Forgotten Mustang

Mustang fans across the world celebrated its 50th anniversary last year with one slight problem…

They were 2 years late.

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Mustang I Concept

The first production Mustang rolled off the lines on March 9th, 1964, but 3 years prior Lee Iocacca and a committee of Ford Managers were looking for an answer to GM’s successful Corvair Monza. That answer came in the form of John Najjar Ferzely and Phil Clark’s “Allegro” project tasked with building a concept for the “Cougar”. History, of course, would remember this by the name later inspired by Clark’s cross-country drive where he encountered the living version of the car’s namesake in Nevada.

Ford’s design vice-president Eugene Bordinat was looking for a newsworthy “bell-ringer” for Fords new-model press release in the fall of 1961 when he discovered the Mustang I design. He gave engineer Roy Lunn (Aston Martin DB2, Jeep Cherokee, Boss 429 etc.) the task of taking the car from a designer’s dream to a drive-able machine in just 60 days. Roy was up to the challenge, and the press was delighted with a preview of Dearborn’s first true sports car later that year.

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Automodello 1962 Mustang I with COA signed by Dan Gurney

The public got their first glance of the Mustang I on October 7, 1962, when it made its formal debut at the United States Grand Prix in Watkins Glen, New York. The iconic test driver and contemporary Formula One racer, Dan Gurney, lapped the track in a demonstration. His lap times were only slightly off the pace of the F1 race cars.

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Hot Wheels Mustang Concept I

 

After an extensive tour with a heavy focus on college campuses, it was decided that the impractical design and expensive price tag of the Mustang I was unlikely to do well with the younger demographic of emerging baby boomers. It was housed in a basement and forgotten about until 1967 when Ford executives Morris Carter and Frank Theyleg discovered its remains and sent it to the Scientific Research Garage to be restored. It became an official part of the Ford Museum collection in 1982.

 

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Mustang I Design Sheet

Although it may not garner as much attention as its production descendants, the Mustang I was the catalyst to the car we know and love today. I hope you’ll join us in documenting its collectibles and wishing the father of all Mustangs a very happy 53rd birthday!