Did We Mention We Get To Play With Toys at hobbyDB?

hobbydb office tatooine

There are many reasons it’s awesome to work at hobbyDB, not the least of which is our office space. Our Boulder, Colorado headquarters are located in a building that bears a strong resemblance to Luke Skywalker’s home. In fact, we’ve officially nicknamed it Tatooine. Inside, the walls rarely meet at right angles, and bright, primary colors abound.

The latest bit of fun? Our new mini conference room. The wall-mounted Hot Wheels track is great for keeping meetings light and non-confrontational, unless some sort of racing action breaks out, in which case we race for keeps. A dry erase board is also on hand for keeping track of points standings. Or for, you know, conducting actual work.

Hot Wheels room at hobbyDB

All kidding aside, a little fun in the workplace helps create an atmosphere in which folks look forward to spending time. So, what’s the most fun thing in your workplace? Let us know in the comments section!

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Kidrobot’s Allen Richardson Joins hobbyDB Advisory Board

Allen Richardson Kidrobot

Over the past year, hobbyDB has been collecting everything from Kidrobot, and now we’ve added Allen Richardson. No, he’s not a Vinyl Art Toy, he’s VP of Product and Marketing for Kidrobot, and he’s joining our Advisory Board.

The Kidrobot archive on hobbyDB is the most complete listing you will find anywhere on the internet, and Allen will be able to help us stay on top of all the new releases. “I get to work with the best independent vinyl artists and largest licenses available today,” he told us. “I love getting to live in two very different worlds and make a living within them both.”

If that sounds like a fun job, consider the rest of his history in the world of toys.

He started in the video game world with Konami, and then moved to Tiger Electronics. When Tiger was acquired by Hasbro, he was put in charge of their “Star Wars” product line. “It was a dream come true as I had collected action figures all of my life. My earliest memories were of receiving the very first Star Wars action figures for Christmas. Star Wars, and most all of what we call the “Boys Action” category, has been in my blood for a very long time.”

As Director of Marketing /Product for Hasbro, he handled a few other brands you may have heard of: Indiana Jones, Jurassic Park, The Littlest Pet Shop, FurReal Friends, VideoNow, Hitclips, PooChi, and Furby for example.

And before coming to Kidrobot, he worked for Sphero. “I returned to Star Wars to work on everyone’s favorite new Droid: BB-8! Being able to take traditional toy play and add an app-based experience to it was truly innovative and memorable.”

Aside from those interests, he collects original comic art. His favorite piece is a Judge Dredd page from “2000AD” by Brian Bolland. “This page pairs my favorite character with my favorite artist. They are pretty rare, so I was elated to finally have it for my collection.”

hobbyDB is just as glad to have Allen on board.

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Shelby American Collection Opens Shop at hobbyDB

Of all the amazing things to experience in Boulder, Colorado – the mountains, the food, hobbyDB’s headquarters – one of the very best is the Shelby American Collection. If you’ve never been to this museum, you’re only missing out on the most incredible collection of Cobra, Shelby Mustang, and Ford GT40 cars that changed the face of auto racing in the 1960s. 

Shelby American Collection Boulder Colorado

carroll shelby for president bumper sticker

hobbyDB is proud to join forces with the museum to help document their collection and also to operate the only official online store to offer exclusive items for sale. “Teaming up with hobbyDB will bring the museum new exposure and help Shelby fans and collectors get their hands on museum apparel, books and our collection of Shelby American Collection produced posters,” said Steve Volk, President of the museum. The Shelby American Collection has produced apparel, an annual range of very collectible limited run posters with historic racing photos and books about the production cars you wish you could own, and bumper stickers in case you do have an appropriate car in your garage. Proceeds from the sales help maintain the museum.

Shelby 50th anniversary poster

The collection includes rare production cars, race cars, prototypes, and one of a kind car parts. If the cars themselves weren’t enough of an attraction, the array of memorabilia surrounding them is also mind blowing. Models of all kinds of Shelby cars, art, advertisements, trophies… you name it, it’s there. There are also exhibits highlighting other pioneers of 1960s racing and design including Carroll Shelby, of course, but also Enzo Ferrari and Henry Ford.

Shelby Cars in Detail museum book

The Shelby American Collection operates as a not-for-profit organization and is open only on Saturdays.

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Johnny Lightning Strikes Again!

This interview originally appeared on the DiecastX magazine blog. Special thanks to them for letting us reprint it here.

By Matt Boyd

Johnny Lightning Tom Lowe

The Johnny Lightning brand is near and dear to Tom Lowe. Having resurrected the brand once back in 1994 with Playing Mantis, he is doing it again with his current company, Round 2.

Johnny Lightning (JL) is a brand name with which all fans of 1:64 diecast will be instantly familiar. Introduced originally by Topper Toys in 1969, quick on the heels of Hot Wheels’ launch, JL focused from the outset on speed above all. To raise brand awareness and further emphasize its association with speed, JL sponsored Al Unser’s race car in the 1970 and ’71 Indy 500s, capturing victory both years. The victories raised the brand’s profile and greatly boosted sales, but even that was not enough to weather the financial difficulties of its parent company, which went under in 1971.

Fast-forward 22 years, when Tom Lowe, CEO of Playing Mantis, acquired the rights to the brand name and revived production of many of the original castings, soon to be joined by a host of all-new vehicles. Fans of the original Topper JLs were drawn in by the nostalgia, while a new generation of fans was attracted by JL’s commitment to the accurate portrayal of real vehicles. The brand thrived and eventually caught the eye of RC2, who purchased Playing Mantis from Tom in 2004. The JL brand soldiered on under RC2’s stewardship, but the company gradually shifted its focus toward its more lucrative preschool markets and JL, while still rolling, got less attention. RC2 itself was bought by Japanese toy manufacturer TOMY in 2011. It initially continued to rerelease versions of RC2’s JL castings, but in 2013, it suspended JL production.

Enter, once again, Tom Lowe and his current venture: Round 2. The producer of the Auto World brand of 1:18 and 1:64 diecast, Round 2 was uniquely positioned to understand the current market conditions and also the value of the JL brand. This past September, Round 2 made the big announcement that it had acquired the rights to JL and would be resuming production of the beloved brand. So we went straight to the source and asked Tom how it all came about and what collectors can expect from the new generation of Johnny Lightning.

[MB] With this announcement, you are in the unique position of having twice brought the Johnny Lightning brand back from the brink of extinction. Have you been watching JL’s fortunes over the last 12 years? At what point did you feel the calling to play that role again? Did you approach it the same way the second time?

[TL] Sure, I’ve been following Johnny Lightning since I sold the business in 2004 to RC2. I have a good relationship with a couple of executives at RC2 (now TOMY), and I have been talking to them about the possibility of me taking over JL for a few years now. The approach had to be different because it is not an abandoned brand without any tool bank, like it was in 1994.

Johnny Lightning Playing Mantis

By the time RC2 bought Playing Mantis, JL had amassed quite a tool library. The challenge for Tom and the Round 2 crew is deciding which ones not to rerelease!

I heard you brought back several of the core team that was with you at Playing Mantis. How did that come about? Was it difficult to “get the band back together,” so to speak?

Well, two of the team members were already working for Round 2 (Tony Karamitsos and Mike Groothuis). I reached out to Mac Ragan this past summer, and he was excited to join the team, so I hired him. He started in November 2015. So yeah, it’s pretty amazing I have the same core team in place to bring the brand back.

It appears that there is a deliberate effort to recapture the Playing Mantis era—down to the logo and the initial product lines you’ve announced. What is the thought process behind that?

We will utilize the Playing Mantis logo on the front of the package and also go back to the original sharp “edgy” JL logo. I prefer this logo and the recognition it brings to the Playing Mantis era. And it will let collectors easily know that the product was developed and produced by me and my team.

The first releases should all be available in stores by late January. And collectors will find them in the usual places. Walmart, Target, and Toys“R”Us are onboard. Joining the national stores is Meijer, a large regional chain. And of course, we have our loyal hobby stores and online retailers.

The Johnny Lightning website will be the go-to place for the latest information on current and upcoming releases as well as feature stories and information on where to find specific cars. Plus, we’re developing an interactive garage designed to make cataloging your collection not only useful but fun. And we’ll live-feed our news to social-media outlets, like Facebook, where collectors can talk with us about the latest news, comment, repost it, and so on.

Johnny Lightning VW Surf Bus White

White Lightning editions were among the rarest and most collectible JLs. Look for those to return, as well.

Why did you choose the cars you did?

Well, the JL tool bank is very large. With all the variations, there are nearly a thousand different vehicles to choose from. Of course, we know that some of the earlier tools are not up to the current level of detail, especially the cars that were tooled from 1994 to 1996. Playing Mantis was just getting started and was learning how to make quality diecast from the school of hard knocks!

So what we do is get the team together (pizza and beer help!) and just start choosing castings that we think might make sense. They need to be solid castings and can’t be released more than three or four times over the past five years. Many of the cars we choose have only been produced a few times, and I think you will be pleased with our first selections.

What was the most difficult part bringing the cars to market?

Actually, it was the time and effort it took to move the tools from RC2’s factory to the factory we will be using. I think we moved more than 200 tools in just 60 days. That’s a lot of steel moving around.

We hear you also acquired Racing Champions. Tell us about your plans for that brand.

Yeah, we did! RC2/TOMY was not marketing any product under Racing Champions. It’s an incredible brand that is very well known. The tool bank is awesome, too. No Racing Champions products have been mass-produced for a number of years, which is incredible, to say the least. So our plans are to bring the brand out of extinction and start making great diecast again!

We’ll start early next year with the relaunch of the Racing Champions MINT line. These are cast from the original Racing Champions and Ertl molds. Collectors will recognize the familiar black packaging and display box for each car. If the model had a diecast chassis in the MINT line, we include that again. But this time around, we amp up the painted details to give every car a new level of authenticity.

Round 2 also produces Auto World. Now that you have JL, how will that affect Auto World?

We continue to support and produce Auto World True 1:64-scale diecast. Round 2 now has three brands: JL, Auto World, and Racing Champions. Three great brands with one of the largest tool banks in the world. We plan on doing everything possible to create a large variety of exceptional products and bring the passion back to our hobby.

If you were speaking directly to JL fans, what is the one thing you most want them to know about the return of their beloved nameplate?

That we are very passionate about the brand and will do our best to make the product that collectors will love and put smiles on their face. If I or the guys on the team would not personally buy the product, then we won’t make it!

Johnny Lightning returns 2016

Key to recapturing the magic of the Playing Mantis/JL days was getting the band back together. Mike Groothuis (far left) and Tony Karamitsos (far right) were already at Round 2. Tom approached Mac Ragan (center right) this past summer, and he signed on, too.

Comments (10 Comments)
Billy Kingsley

Reading this literally gave me chills- Racing Champions means so much to me that it's hard to put into words. I've dedicated most of my life, since I discovered the brand at age 8 in 1992, to collecting every NASCAR issue of Racing Champions. I also collected several hundred of their non-NASCAR issues, and they have gotten me through some tough times...when I lost my dad to cancer immersing myself in my collection is now the only good memory I have of that entire time period. When the last Racing Champions issue came out in 2007- a Jack Sprague promo- I realized soon afterwords that it was the end, and I have not enjoyed the hobby as much since then.

Now, this is great news! Hopefully the metal Round 2 is going to use won't suffer from metal fatigue. I've lost several of my RC street cars- especially the later issues from Classified Classics, to that problem.

Once again, I am thrilled, and thank you for this post!

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Corrugated Car Captivates Collectors

1979 Lincoln Continental cardboard front
Detroit-born artist and teacher Shannon Goff was always fascinated by cars in general and her grandfather’s 1979 Lincoln Continental in particular. For years she had contemplated making a replica of it in some medium but the sheer size of the project was intimidating.

Did we mention it’s a full-sized replica? Finally, she decided on cardboard as a medium and jumped in full throttle. “I had considered making it the color of my grandfather’s, but in the end I decided white was perfect,” said Goff. “It’s forlorn and forgotten, a ghost rider of sorts. It’s about memory and loss and is ultimately a memorial to my grandfather and to the city of Detroit.”

1979 Lincoln Continental cardboard spare tire

Even without engine or undercarriage parts, the car is impressive in its attention to details such as keyholes and delicate bits of chrome trim. You can see more photos and read more about it on thisiscolossal.com

On a similar note, there is a full sized Mercedes-Benz 300SL made entirely out of wood on hobbyDB. If you know of any other similar full sized models, let us know in the comments!

1979 Lincoln Continental cardboard steering wheel

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