Funko Posts

The Toys of Summer: A Look at Some of the Season’s Best Collectibles

Summer Toys

Nobody on the road. Nobody on the beach. We feel it in the air. The summer’s out of reach.

Don Henley’s words ring true as we enter the last weekend of the summer. Fortunately for us, the Toys of Summer aren’t gone.

Before we shed the last of the season’s sun, we take a quick look back at some of the best new collectibles to emerge since we said goodbye to spring.

Funko

A lack of a physical San Diego Comic-Con because of COVID concerns didn’t slow Funko down from releasing a summer’s worth of new items.

Here’s a look at a handful of the most valuable Pop! Vinyl figures that arrived this summer.

Toucan (Astronaut)(Red)[SDCC]

SDCC Toucan

Corpse Bride Glow in the Dark

Corpse BrideKatsuki Bakugo

Katsuku BakugoMcDonalds 5-pack

McDonaldsBlack Lightning

Black LightningLego

Some collectors chose to spend their time in quarantine this summer making connections. Lego connections.

Both brick and gear heads were treated to a masterpiece when Lego parked its Lamborghini Sian FKP in front of our eyes.

At 3,696 pieces, this hot rod has incredible attention to detail, including an 8-speed working gearbox.

Lego Ferrari

On a smaller, yet galactic, scale, Lego also introduced us to two new Lego Star Wars collections with the intricate Bespin Duel and Death Star Final Duel. Whether you include Darth Vader’s or Luke Skywalker’s hands when you assemble yours is up to you.

Star Wars

Star Wars

Hot Wheels

We head back to the summer of 1971 with one of the most popular Hot Wheels of the year – the ‘71 Datsun 510.

This spectraflame bright yellow design and Real Riders 5-spoke wheels with red stripe tampo lives up to its bumble bee look with a “bzzz” license plate. 

It currently values at $105 on hobbyDB, making it the most valuable 2020 release so far in the hobbyDB database.

Hot WheelsHot Wheels

What says summer better than a VW Bug? Hot Wheels released its Volkswagen “Classic Bug” – Volkswagen Transporter T1 Pickup this season to much fanfare. The bug is part of the 2020 Car Culture – Team Transport series that includes ‘69 Ford Mustang Boss 302 – Retro Rig, Mercedes-Benz 300 SL – Euro Hauler and 2016 Ford GT Race – Ford C-800.

Volkswagen

Yu-Gi-Oh

Yu-Gi-Oh cards made their debut in 1999, but remain just as popular today. That was proven this summer with Konami’s Tin of Lost Memories collection. The 249-card set, including three World Premier cards in Red-Eyes Dark Dragoon and Successor Soul, as well as Strength in Unity and Destined Rivals.

Check out the entire Yu-Gi-Oh! database here.

Yu-Gi-Oh!Yu-Gi-Oh!Yu-Gi-Oh!

Yu-Gi-Oh!Others

We round out the summer with a look at the whimsical, cute and perhaps a tongue-in-cheek metaphor regarding the status of the year 2020 with a look at the vinyl toy company 100% Soft and its Dumpster Fire line.

This little guy sold out quickly, but you can pre-order yours now via Entertainment Earth when it comes back around again, likely in September. And keep an eye out for its Light-Up variant arriving in January.Dumpster FireDumpster FireWe’re always looking for volunteers to join our team of curators. If you’d like to share your knowledge of a particular subject with us, message us at zack@hobbydb.com or click the Contact hobbyDB button located on the right hand side of every page.

Enjoy the autumn!

hobbyDB / Pop Price Guide Price Listing Record Day Resounding Success

The hobbyDB family of brands is proud to report that its first hobbyDB / Pop Price Guide Price Listing Record Day was a resounding success.

A tip of the cap goes out to the members of the hobbyDB Data team and our volunteer Price Squad, who combed through more than 8,500 listings to assign prices or delete bad items — obliterating our goal of 6,000.

As a result, you can now expect to see more up-to-date and accurate values in your collection, especially when it comes to items such as Funko vinyl figures and Hard Rock Cafe pins.

Pop Price GuideRead more about the hobbyDB / PPG Price Listing Record Day here.

What is a Price Listing?

Our price values rely on our specialized algorithm that culls an average value of an item based on eBay and other secondary market sales.

It’s up to our small Data Team and volunteer Price Squad to pour over these listings with a keen eye to weed out items based on condition and fakes, as well as convention stickers and price gouging. Essentially any variable that can affect an item’s value. 

Price Listing Record Day

As you might already know, Pop Price Guide recently migrated databases with hobbyDB. This is part of our continued pursuit of becoming the ultimate resource for collectibles pricing.

The hobbyDB / PPG Price Listing Record Day was an effort to combat the build-up of listings that accrued while our team was busily tending to our migration efforts.

Now that the latest round of the migration is almost complete, we’ll likely attempt another Price Listing Record Day within the next few weeks.

And you can help out.

Join the volunteer Price Squad

We’re always scouring the galaxy to find volunteers to join our team. The training is light and many members have fun with it.

If you’re interested in becoming a part of our Price Squad, message us at support@hobbydb.com or simply click the green Contact hobbyDB button on the right side of every page.

Talking to Josh & Mike from Talk’n Pops about Funko and Collecting in general

Christian recently spoke to Josh and Mike for their Podcast that has been going forever, covering Funko Pops and some other subjects.  You will find this particular episode here.  You can also listen to it right here  –

Or if you rather read, here is the full transcript  –

Mike: How’s it going, everybody?

Josh: Hey, welcome to a very special episode of talking pops. I am your host Josh.

Mike: I’m your host Mike.

Josh: And we have a special guest with us this week.

Mike: Let me play the theme music.

Josh: Go for it.

[Music]

A Collection of 10 of the World’s Largest Collections

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

One comment we at hobbyDB hear a lot is “do you get to play with toys all day?” (The answer, sadly is no.) Another is “you must have the world’s largest collections of (Hot Wheels, Funko Pops, video games, etc.)” Also, no, but most of us do have a pretty good collection of something or another. We all geek out about some kind of collectible culture here. It’s sort of a requirement to be part of the hobbyDB project.

Which got us to thinking… who does have the world’s largest collection of bobblehead dolls? Or diecast cars? Or baseball cards? Or Barbie dolls? So, we did a little digging. Most of these figures have been verified by some organization, such as the Guinness Book of World Records, and exact numbers might not be up to the minute, as one trip to the toy store can add several more to the totals.

The hobbyDB database has a pretty good start documenting some of these (and some of the most complete data on the internet on others), but we are always looking for collectors and experts to contribute their knowledge to make it even more complete. If you’re interested in getting involved, let us know! We also are running a WeFunder campaign if you want to really get involved!

bobblehead hall of fameBobbleheads, Nodders, Wobblers – Just over a year ago (February 1, 2019), The National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum opened its doors, a project started by friends Phil Sklar and Brad Novak of Milwaukee. They have collected over 10,000 bobbleheads, wobblers, and nodders, dating back to some of the earliest sports models from the 1960s. While most of the collection is on display at their gallery, they often loan out part of the exhibit for special events. If a particular team is visiting the Milwaukee Brewers for a baseball series, figures related to that team might be on display at the ballpark.

As far as individual collectors with a focus, Philip Darling is credited by Guinness as having the largest gathering of sports-related bobbleheads, with over 2,300 of them, with an emphasis on hockey.

largest model car collectionDiecast VehiclesNabil Karam of Beirut, Lebanon, has a documented collection of over 37,000 diecast model cars of all brands and scales (37,777 at most recent count). Many of them are on display in some 400 painstakingly assembled dioramas. He says he has a weakness for Porsches, so it’s likely he has the largest collection of models of just that marque.

As far as single brands go, Mike Zarnock, well known among diecast fans, is said to have the world record for the largest Hot Wheels collection. But at an estimated 20,000, it’s just that… an estimate (a really big one though). He is verified as having the collection of the most models of different cars, at 8,128 (and if he’s been to the store in the last few days, he’s probably picked up a few more). The hobbyDB database shows over 40,000 distinct Hot Wheels variants, so Zarnock is halfway there! And if you have a collection of your own, you can utilize the hobbyDB tools to organize, manage, and track it.

worlds largest hot wheels collection

 

worlds largest funko pop collectionFunko PopsPop! figures have only been around a handful of years, so the largest collection isn’t as massive as some of the older toys. Nonetheless, Paul Scardino of Virginia had amassed a documented 4,475 of them by the end of 2018. Considering how many have been released since, that number has probably expanded.

If you’re really into Pop! figures, check out poppriceguide.com, part of the hobbyDB family. As the name suggests, it’s probably the most complete Pop! reference online, and has current, accurate pricing information.

worlds largest lego collectionLego sets – To be technical, this record also includes some other brands of building toys… Frank Smoes of Melbourne, Australia has 3,837 complete plastic building sets. He started building his collection in 1980 and estimates there are over 1.2 million bricks and at least 8,000 Minifigures in the collection.

The most complete collection of just Lego products is likely the vault at Lego’s headquarters in Denmark. They have preserved at least one copy of virtually every set ever released by the company, locked safely away for preservation (though it would be fun to play with some of those).

Video Games – Antonio Monteiro of Richmond Virginia has 20,139 games in his home. Not just the games, of course, where’s the fun in that? He also has over 100 consoles and computers to actually play the games on. Guinness said the collection was so big it took eight days to count before they verified the record.

world's largest license platesLicense Plates – Peter and Tamas Kenyeres of Hungary have amassed a collection of 11,345 license plates over the years. The oldest plate in their collection is from Austro-Hungarian Empire (1900). They also somehow acquired a plate that just says “B7,” which was a Hungarian minister’s plate from 1945 to 1948. 

But wait… Paul Franke of San Diego has since compiled a collection of over 22,000 plates, twice the size of theirs… but it hasn’t been verified by Guinness yet. It’s possible someone reading this right now have a bigger collection than that. If so, please contact us!

Since hobbyDB is located in a state with one of the most iconic license plates, this is a topic dear to our hearts!

worlds largest funko james bond collectionJames  Bond MemorabiliaNick Bennett of Leigh, Lancashire, UK, has a collection of all things Bond-related totaling 12,463 gadgets and other goodies at last count. Not just toys and action figures, but actual movie props in some cases. And yes, he keeps them in a secret lair in his basement.

hobbyDB is putting together the world’s largest collection of, well, collectibles, at least the largest online. Even better, because we include everything collectible, we can cross-reference any collectible that’s related to another by even the most obscure strand. The examples above are some areas where we have a pretty good start on documenting everything, but it’s collectors like you who help us complete the set. So, if you see some gaps in the hobbyDB project, please help fill them in for us.

Soon, we’ll look at some other giant collections, in areas where we really could use an expert or several to grace us with their knowledge and jump-start those parts of the database.

If you want to be a bigger part of the hobbyDB family, here’s your chance… Learn more at our Wefunder profile. We thank you!

Rise of the Return of the Attack of 11 Star Wars Collectibles from 11 Episodes

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

With the final chapter of the Star Wars trilogy of trilogies about to hit theaters, let’s look back at the history of the franchise in terms of Star Wars collectibles. Which character (and related collectible) was the most significant from each movie? It could be the most popular, the rarest, the most controversial, or the most ground-breaking. Also, let’s look at these in the order you’re supposed to now watch them, instead of when they were actually made.

Star Wars collectiblesEpisode I – The Phantom Menace: Let’s just get this out of the way. It’s Jar Jar Binks. It has to be Jar Jar. Fans of the original trilogy (or the middle trilogy depending on how you count) had some trepidation about reviving the franchise for a trio of prequels. And much about Episode 1 was not received well when it hit theaters. History has been a bit more kind to the movie in the 20 years since its release, but poor Jar Jar was hated then and his persona has aged even worse. Some sort of talking Jar Jar figure has to be it. Perhaps one that dances as well?

Episode II – Attack of the Clones: “Boba, I am your father!” Boba Fett rivals several other characters for coolest rogue in the universe (Apologies to Han Solo and Lando Calrissian). This film concerns Jango Fett, Boba’s father. Well, Boba is his clone, so “father” is a loose term. Either way, Someone from the Fett lineage had to make this list, and since they’re genetically identical, it’s Jango time!

Star Wars MerchandiseEpisode III – Revenge of the Sith: Remember that plucky kid who won the pod race in Episode I? No spoilers, but it turns out he becomes the baddest of the bad, Darth Vader himself. If you watch the movies in order, this is the first on-screen appearance of Vader. This movie doesn’t have a lot of strong collectible contenders contemporary with the film’s release, so let’s go more modern with this diorama of Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi dueling for the first time.

Episode IV – A New Hope: Over 40 years after its release, this movie has held up impeccably well. The entire cast of characters and the spaceship designs haven’t lost any of their magic over the years. This was also the dawn of the modern collectibles age, and the studio was not at all prepared for the popularity of the movie or the toys and other products it would inspire. One thing they did get right at the time… The Marvel comics adaptation of the saga. When the movie hit theaters, “Star Wars” issue #1 was not far behind. Lessons were learned, memories were made. Issue #1 combines everything great about the movies plus the world of comics. And there are some rare variants, too.

Star Wars ToysEpisode V – The Empire Strikes Back: In the first movie (or fourth?) Princess Leia was kind of a MacGuffin, a damsel in distress in a frumpy gown. But in this installment, she busts out a laser rifle on Hoth, and then gets several chances to be the hero in ways viewers never saw coming. And let’s face it, the scene with Jabba the Hutt and Salacious Crumb is memorable for so many reasons. So, this Funko Pop set with Leia, the giant space slug and his jester works.

Episode VI – Return of the Jedi: By the time the third installment (or sixth by this count) arrived, toy companies and collectors were becoming savvy on how to deal with collectibles. Tons of action figures were sold, and many of those were preserved in their packaging, so many of them are not all that rare. On the other hand, a pre-production glitch created one unintended collector’s item. Early versions of the movie poster referred to the film as Revenge of the Jedi, but for various reasons, Lucas decided to change the title to Return. So original posters with the early title are worth a lot more than the official version. (Just make sure it’s not a reprint!)

Star Wars collectiblesEpisode VII – The Force Awakens: A lot of folks saw this film as something of a reboot/remake of the first Star Wars movie (or the fourth… you get the idea.) Our hero Finn impersonating a Stormtrooper, Kylo Ren wearing a black mask and cape (nowhere near as menacing as Darth Vader ever was, though), and Rey… okay, not a damsel in distress, but a fierce fighter right from the get-go. But the movie, from a collectible standpoint, belongs to BB-8, especially the remote control version!

Episode VIII – The Last Jedi: No spoilers here, but it’s neat to see Luke Skywalker again, especially with Han Solo and Leia in short supply. Let’s just say Rey really owns this movie. So any figure where she’s wielding a lightsaber fits the bill here. (Not that she’s the Last Jedi referred to in the title or anything. No spoilers, remember?)

Episode IX – Rise of Skywalker: Baby Yoda isn’t in this movie, is he? Since it doesn’t come out until this weekend, we can’t be sure. So far, the available collectibles haven’t revealed any apparent spoilers. Regardless, it really feels like nothing in this movie can’t possibly top Baby Yoda.

Bonus episodes:

Rogue One – A Star Wars Story: This is a strange entry into the Star Wars Canon… it’s a prequel to Episode 4, but not part of the three other prequels. So there are a lot of characters who were never heard from before or after. So let’s give this to K-2SO by default.

Star Wars toys

Solo – A Star Wars Story: Not a character, but it’s gotta be young Han Solo’s Speeder, right? Sure the Millennium Falcon is the coolest spaceship of all time, but what piece of junk did Solo pilot before that piece of junk? Also, the rocket engines in the back look like the taillights of a 1960s Ford Falcon. That’s the kind of loving detail that makes the Star Wars saga so great.

If you have other suggestions for the most significant collectible from any of these movies, please let us know in the comments!