Funko Posts

18 Cereal Mascots Who Were Part of Your Balanced Childhood

tony the tiger groucho marx

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

From the first moment someone decided to ramp up the sugar content of breakfast food to appeal to children, Cereal Mascots have been a part of your breakfast table. Some obvious ones come to mind (Sonny, Tony, and Lucky) but we’re also trying to dig a bit deeper here for some more obscure, short-lived brands. So let’s dig in! You might have some flashbacks (or just a huge sugar buzz). And in hobbyDB fashion, we’re mostly concerned with the collectibles related to these characters.

cap'n crunchCap’n Horatio Magellan Crunch has long been one of the heavy hitters in the business, but has had a flotilla of additional characters on board with his campaign over the years. Most notably pirate Jean LaFoote, whose Cinnamon Crunch had a high seas beef with the Cap’n for some reason. The Crunchberry Beast’s motives were less clear, but he seems benevolent. This yellow, spotted shmoo could survive on just the Crunchberries found on his island… just like kids would go on to devour Oops! All Berries cereal and live to tell.

quisp quake quangarooYou remember Quisp, right? Quisp was a staple of breakfast tables in the 1960s and ’70s, who makes frequent comebacks in the grocery store so you won’t forget him. The goofy space alien with the propeller on his head was designed by Jay Ward, who also brought you Bullwinkle, Mr. Peabody and other wacky animation. But Quisp had a rival, a miner named Quake. Quake got his own cereal in the mid ’60s (essentially the same recipe, just shaped differently). They were positioned as having a feud, in which kids could vote with Mom’s wallet. In the early ’70s, kids were given the opportunity to mail in postcards to vote on who got to survive and who would be left soggy and forgotten. I gotta admit, it was a powerful kick mailing that card in!

trix rabbitBut there was a third cereal in the Quaker queue. After Quake was shoved back into the ground, a similar cereal called Quake’s Quangaroos came out, but with a flavor that looked like orange, tasted like orange, but it wasn’t orange. No vote was needed to banish this cereal. (Sadly, there are no collectibles of this character… yet.)

The fate of the Trix Rabbit (did you know his name is Tricks?) was similary tied to the fickle nature of kids’ whims… in 1976, kids could send in a postcard voting on whether the rabbit would finally get to eat the cereal. He won handily. They repeated it in 1980 and again in 1991 with similar outcomes. Who says democracy will never work?

freakies cerealThe Freakies were very much a product of their groovy time. Weird fruit shaped critters with back stories and distinct personalities were a bit much for this extremely, well freaky combination. In addition to early figures and magnets found in specially marked boxes, they have been immortalized more recently.

monster cerealsSpeaking of weird cereal spokesmonsters, General Mills had a huge hit on their hands when they introduced Count Chocula and Franken Berry in the early ’70s. And they struck it big again with Boo Berry, whose purpose was to scare the other two squabbling mascots. But how many of you remember the other monster cereals? Fruit Brute joined the fray for a few years, but was sent to an early grave, as was Yummy Mummy in the late 80s. Funko dove deep and included those fruity monsters in their Wacky Wobblers and Pops series.

sugar beargarbage pail kids sugar crustage sewageHoney Smacks and Golden Crisp cereals share more than similar recipes… They were known as Sugar Smacks and Super Sugar Crisp originally, and featured a frog (Dig ’Em) and a bear (Sugar Bear) as their mascots. Both cereals would rebrand to Honey Smacks (and then just Smacks) and Golden Crisp (although the mascot is stlll Sugar Bear). Obscure fun fact: In its early days, Hanna Barbera’s Quick Draw McGraw repped Sugar Smacks. And naturally, Garbage Pail Kids got a lot of fodder out of such characters.

Of course, we’ve only just devoured breakfast. Sometime soon, we’ll take a look at spokes characters for other meals (as well as some non-edible products).

Who is your favorite cereal spokes character? Let us know, especially if there are relevant toys and collectibles.

Seller Highlight: Blind Boxes Galore with New Trusted Seller blindboxes!

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There’s something to be said for that breathless moment of anticipation before cracking open a blind box or bag.

Collectors have been discovering their favorite blind box characters since 2015 via the Pop Price Guide Marketplace trusted seller blindboxes.

The blindboxes store features a variety of, you guessed it, blind boxes and blind bags from multiple franchises and brands.

Along with Funko Mystery Minis and Pint Size Heroes, the blindboxes store is also the perfect marketplace to fill out your Kidrobot collection.

That’s in addition to popular lines of MyMojiQee and Heatherette: The Empire Series.

As well as trying your luck with individual blind boxes or bags, why not improve your chances of pulling a rare figure with entire cases, such as the sealed case of KidRobot Marvel Munny Zipper Pulls Series 2.

Check out these items and many more at the blindboxes store on the PPG Marketplace!

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Celebrate Independence Day With These Spirited July 4 Collectibles

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

It’s a long weekend for some folks, but collecting never takes a holiday! Fourth of July, Independence Day, whichever you want to call it, is a big deal for a lot of toys and figures. In this case, we are considering overtly patriotic collectibles, so even if they aren’t quite tied into July 4 events, you will still salute them.

july 4 hot wheelsThe diecast world has embraced the holiday quite frequently. Johnny Lightning did a series of July 4th cars in 2000 with special cards and graphics. Hot Wheels responded with annual holiday cars for the next several years, with July 4 being one of them. And as part of their 50th Anniversary, Hot Wheels did an extended Stars and Stripes series, which hit the pegs last summer. One thing they all have in common… they are all based on American marques, of course. Even Radio Flyer gets in on the action.

july 4 evel knievelThere are unabashedly patriotic things that aren’t related specifically to Independence Day but nevertheless, feel right at home on this date more than any other. Stars and stripes: who wore it better, Captain America or Evel Knievel? Trick question… the answer is Elton John (so what if he’s British?).

july 4 patriots 76ersAnother question: Most patriotic sports uniforms… the Philadelphia 76ers or the New England Patriots? Both wrong!  It’s the Colorado Rockies (hard to top “purple mountains majesty,” right?).

July 4 hard rock cafeHard Rock Cafe has released numerous pins and collectibles related to July 4. If you’re looking to complete the set, there are over 1,500 pins in our database just for this occasion, so get going.

july 4 garbage pail kidsThe Garbage Pail Kids have also managed to find a way to commemorate independence in their own, umm, special way. Numerous cards fit the spirit of the day, not to mention their takedowns of various politicians over the years.

july 4 smash up derbyThe 1976 American Bicentennial was a year-long stars and stripes fest that produced some of the greatest collectibles and toys ever. Seaboard Coast Line Railroad created a special Spirit of ’76 locomotive which became one of the best selling electric train models ever. Not to be outdone, Kenner decorated their already marvelous Smash-Up Derby set with a red, white, and blue motif for the most patriotic Ford vs Chevy battle ever. Buick offered a, ahem, subtle “Free Spirit” livery on the ’76 Century (or would that be a Bicentury?) And of course, many states got into the action with special Bicentennial license plates.

july 4 independence dayThe 1996 sci-fi flick Independence Day celebrated by blowing up the White House as well as half the other iconic buildings in the world. Will Smith and Jeff Goldblum versus aliens meant spectacular, explosive fun at the cineplex and on your shelf.

july 4 uncle samjuly 4 black catSpeaking of holiday explosives, fireworks may have been invented in China, but doggone it, the USA has certainly made them our own thing. Black Cat has one of the wickedest logos of any company in the world, and this vintage poster is pure dynamite.

Other icons of the holiday have foreign roots as well. The Statue of Liberty was a gift from France, of course, but she has made her home in New York ever since. The classic poster of Uncle Sam, oddly enough, was derived from a British character. Miss Teenage America on the other hand? She’s from here and drives a Mercury Comet, of course, at least in this ad.

However you choose to celebrate Independence Day, please be careful this weekend. Don’t want to damage the corners on those boxes and blister packs, right?

Got any other favorite July 4 related collectibles? Tell us about them in the comments!

The Most Expensive Funko Pops Go For Eye-Popping Prices!

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

For a collectible brand that has only been around a few years, Funko Pop! figures can become surprisingly valuable. In all likelihood, you wouldn’t guess that the most expensive Pop character would come from a movie from almost 50 years ago… Alex DeLarge from A Clockwork Orange. Specifically, the very rare glow in the dark version, a copy of which sold recently online for $13,600. There are several variants of this character, so shop carefully if you want to be a high roller.

Funko Pop Alex Clockwork Orange

Other recent sales found on PopPriceGuide.com include a few in the $5,000 and up range. Headless Ned Stark from Game of Thrones ($5,500), Dumbo in gold ($5,050) and A giant version of Freddy Funko as Buzz Lightyear ($5,000). These are actual sales, not just someone asking pie in the sky prices. (PPG is a great place to track the values of Funko figures because the prices are rooted in reality.)

Expensive funko popsWhy are such new collectibles going for so much money? Most of the high-end figures are very limited production variants to begin with, and were sold through special channels such as exclusives at the San Diego Comic Con. So, your ability to get one first hand were super slim to begin with. As limited exclusives, the original price is generally a lot higher than the $10 or so you can find most commons ones for at a store.

Of course, with newer collectibles, it’s always possible the price may drop after the initial hype dies down. Then again, with only a dozen of the Giant Freddy ever made, supply is set and demand will likely only go up.

Here are some additional rundowns on valuable Pop figures from other sources. Keep in mind many of these may be based on asking prices and internet legend. But they’re fun to look through anyway.

  • ComicBook.com – These Rare Funko Pops Will Cost You a Fortune
  • Collective Pop – Top Ten Most Expensive Funko P0ps
  • Games Radar – 10 of Rarest, Most Expensive Funko Pop Vinyls on the Planet
  • Money Inc. – The Most Expensive Funko Pop Figures of All-Time
  • Ranker – 10 of the Rarest Funko Pop Vinyls Money Can Buy
  • Shirtnado.com – People Are Spending Absurd Amounts Of Money On The Rarest Funko Pops Of All Time
  • The Gamer – The 30 Rarest Funko Pop Figures (And How Much They’re Worth)
  • Zavvi.com – The Ten Rarest Funko Pops

If there are other good lists please add them in the comments! And maybe eventually somebody will combine all these lists into one Super List!

Celebrate Mother’s Day With Your Favorite Fictional Moms

 

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

Mother’s Day is an interesting holiday in the collecting world since there aren’t a lot of items specifically targeted with a message for Mom.

mom hard rock pinsHard Rock Cafe has offered quite a few pins and other collectibles over the years, but brands like Hot Wheels haven’t gone all in on the day just yet (well, does this count?). Same thing for action figures.

That said, we decided to celebrate with collectibles referencing some of our favorite fictional Moms. Some are from TV, some from movies. Some are a bit more, umm, nurturing than others.

brady bundy partridgeThe Golden Age of TV Moms – If you’re a certain age, you grew up with a plethora of perfect mothers from 1960s and ’70s sitcoms. Carol Brady from The Brady Bunch is surprisingly not well-represented in collectible form (although the 6 kids and their live-in housekeeper Alice are, so there’s hope). Shirley Partridge of The Partridge Family meets a similar collectible fate. You can get either of their daily drivers in miniature, however.

For collectors of a slightly younger age, there’s always Peggy Bundy, the TV Mom from Married With Children who’s classic in her own unique way.

mom flintstone jetsonYour Mom’s a Cartoon! – The world of animated sitcoms has no shortage of great cartoon moms. The earliest (for real and in fiction) would have to be Wilma Flintstone, whose orange hair and rock-like demeanor were the foundation of that family. Shortly after (and thousands of years in the future) Jane Jetson would provide the same kind of gravitas for her space-age family.

fox sunday vinyl toysQueen Elizabeth funko popJump ahead to Sunday night on Fox, and there’s a trio of cartoon Moms who show up in vinyl and other forms. Lois Griffin (Family Guy) and Linda Belcher (Bob’s Burgers) are definitely stronger characters than the husbands their shows are named after. But the queen of all TV Moms has to be Marge Simpson, who has quietly suppressed her rage and kept The Simpsons from complete family disfunction for 30 years.

Queen Mum – Speaking of queens… oh, wait, she’s real? The Queen of England just kind of seems like a benevolent mother figure from like a Harry Potter novel or something. Yep,  Queen Elizabeth II has been in the public consciousness long enough that folks could forget she’s the actual Queen of England. Apologies for the royal confusion.

munster adams familyMonster Moms – The 1960s brought a couple of family comedies to television in the form of The Munsters and The Adams Family. Regardless of your preference, both were solidly funny shows built on ghoulish but not scary family values. Lily Munster  and Morticia Adams both came across as the sensible matriarchs of their spooky domains

mom game of thronesMonstrous Moms – Mom from Futurama could fit in the previous category… sure, she has three idiot sons, but she’s better known as the head of Mom’s Robot Factory. Her sweet, matronly demeanor in public is betrayed by her savage, sleek, sinister personality behind the scenes. Another Mother who isn’t quite as cuddly as you would hope is Daenerys Targaryen from Game of Thrones. She’s a bad mother, in more ways than one. Of course, the most ferocious might be the Xenomorph Queen from the Alien movies. From her perspective, she is just a protective mother hen, but to Ripley and her crew, she’s a bad mother figure…

i love lucy funko popPerhaps the greatest TV Mom of All – You might not think of Lucille Ball as a ‘TV Mom,” but she was one of the most revolutionary. In 1952, she was pregnant… er, “enceinte.” See, saying the P-word or even discussing it was taboo on TV back then. Heck, showing a baby bump was pretty controversial. Nevertheless, she persisted and actually wrote the pregnancy and birth into a 5-week arc of I Love Lucy, with the birth episode coinciding with the real birth of Desi Arnaz Jr. (son of her husband and co-star). Turns out the general public had no problem with any of this, just the overly protective censors. Fun fact: Lucy was visibly pregnant while filming the pilot episode of the show a couple years earlier, but they just never acknowledged it in the script. Way to go, Mom!

Do you have a favorite fictional mother we didn’t mention? Let us know in the comments!