hobbyDB Team Posts

hobbyDB Collectibles Database Zooms Past 200,000 Entries

The collection just keeps growing at hobbyDB! Our database of anything and everything collectible just blew past the 200,000 item mark this past week, with the addition of the Minichamps James Bond Mustang Mach 1. The milestone came and went so quickly we barely had time to stop and notice! It took 13 months to get the first 100,000 entries in the database and just five months to double that number. At that rate, we’ll reach the million mark in the next year or two! We couldn’t have done it without all of you!

James Bond Minichamps Mustang

That 200,000 figure breaks down to over 178,000 unique Items, and over 34,000 Subject listings. In our collectibles database, an “Item” is an individual collectible you can own, such as a single Hot Wheels car or a Captain America action figure. A “Subject” is a topic or person or thing that can be related to several items, such as Elvis Presley, or Disney. Together, they allow our information to be cross-referenced by users, so they can search for a particular brand of toy like Corgi, or for anything related to a particular subject, such as The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine. (And yes, there is a Corgi version of that sub!)

So many of you helped us to get this far… There are now over 11,000 Users on hobbyDB,  adding entries, editing information, buying, and selling (which is how we keep the lights on). The number of registered users more than doubled over the last five months as well. Over 200 of you have signed on as Curators, volunteering to either help monitor specific pages such as the page for John Wayne or the New York Yankees or to check new items to make sure they are entered as correctly as possible.

hobbydb 200,000 items

Brand partnerships have been a big part of hobbyDB’s rapid growth… several companies have come on board to host their official archives with hobbyDB ranging from vinyl art toys (Kidrobot) to diecast model cars (Kess) to real cars (The Shelby American Collection). The beauty of these relationships is that we get complete, accurate information along with frequent updates and additions. (You even get to preview upcoming prototypes such as this upcoming Eagle Challenger Indy car from Automodello, straight from the horse’s mouth!) 

We’ve also arranged to include data from collector databases such as Hugada’s list of over 60,000 video games and South Texas Diecast’s giant list of Hot Wheels. By combining such archives in one place, we multiply the power of these lists. For example, we can cross reference items of interest to both groups, such as the Nintendo Mario World series of Hot Wheels cars. But even with these massive contributions, we still rely on individual users to fill in missing items and provide updates. It’s like an extension of Wikipedia with a serious concentration on collecting.

At the rate we’re growing, you should be hearing about our 300,000th catalog item in the hobbyDB database before too long. In fact, we’ve received so much information from museums, archives and individuals that we need help sorting it all! We’re looking for volunteers with good editorial skills to join the team and help us add data to the catalog. If you’re interested, let us know (You can hit the chat button in the lower right corner of the screen to reach us)!

New Variant Detail Display!

It’s a sea change at hobbyDB! We realized a while ago that the Show Variant Details pop-down thingumajig wasn’t quite as useful as we intended. So we’ve gotten rid of it!

With the new variant detail display, Curators can now write a short description of the differences between a variant and the others in its group. They can also add a title and description Take a look at what a difference this will make with items such as comic books –

Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 11.54.42 AM

And PEZ dispensers –

PEZ Planes Dusty PEZ Dispenser

And model cars –

Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 11.54.28 AM

As you can see, we’re working hard to make hobbyDB the best place on the net to catalog your favorite collectibles for posterity! But we need all the help we can get, so if you’re not a Curator already and you’re interested in getting involved, let us know by clicking on the chat icon at the bottom right side of your screen. Shoot us a message with which page your like to curate and we’ll be in touch shortly. 

As always let us know what you think about this new feature as well! We’re excited to hear what you think.

Did We Mention We Get To Play With Toys at hobbyDB?

hobbydb office tatooine

There are many reasons it’s awesome to work at hobbyDB, not the least of which is our office space. Our Boulder, Colorado headquarters are located in a building that bears a strong resemblance to Luke Skywalker’s home. In fact, we’ve officially nicknamed it Tatooine. Inside, the walls rarely meet at right angles, and bright, primary colors abound.

The latest bit of fun? Our new mini conference room. The wall-mounted Hot Wheels track is great for keeping meetings light and non-confrontational, unless some sort of racing action breaks out, in which case we race for keeps. A dry erase board is also on hand for keeping track of points standings. Or for, you know, conducting actual work.

Hot Wheels room at hobbyDB

All kidding aside, a little fun in the workplace helps create an atmosphere in which folks look forward to spending time. So, what’s the most fun thing in your workplace? Let us know in the comments section!

13 Video Games Based on Blatant Product Placement

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

Product placement in video games has become an annoying intrusion (except for driving games, in which case branded realism is more than welcome). But over the years, several companies have developed promotional video games starring their actual products, logos, and spokescharacters in acts of commercialism so blatant it’s almost cute. Here are some of the more memorable games of this genre, most of them snack-or-fast-food based, some of them kind of fun.

Kool-Aid Man” (1983)

Kool Aid Man video game

If you sent in 125 proof of purchase seals from Kool-Aid packs, you got this Atari 2600 or Intellivision cartridge for free. And you know what? It was a pretty cool game. Players moved Kool-Aid Man around the screen in an attempt to knock out the Thirsties while also collecting the ingredients for a pitcher of sugary drink before time ran out via the pool at the bottom of the screen draining empty. Confusing? Sure. But, seriously, way more fun than it sounds.

Pepsi Invaders” (aka “Coke Wins”) (1983)

Pepsi Invaders Atari 2600 game

This game was not a huge seller. In fact, it wasn’t for sale at all. Coca Cola poked fun at their rival by producing this version of Space Invaders for their 1983 Sales convention, handing out about 125 copies of this Atari 2600 cartridge to attendees. They replaced the alien shapes of the original game with the letters from PEPSI, but it’s otherwise identical to the mass produced game. Original cartridges sell for a lot of money these days.

Domino’s Pizza “Yo! Noid” (1990)

Dominos Pizza Noid video game

Perhaps no spokescharacter in the history of advertising was more despised and ridiculed than the Noid. With that strike already against it, Domino’s released this Nintendo game to terrible reviews for its pointless play and frustrating level of difficulty. It was like getting double anchovies on your pizza.

Chester Cheetah “Too Cool To Fool” (1992)

Chester Cheetos video game

Long before Goat Simulator, this game allowed you to become a cartoon cheetah who promotes fried cheese curls by riding around on a scooter and jumping on unsuspecting victims’ heads. Because, y’know… EXTREME! The first of two Cheetos based games of that era, it was available for Super Nintendo and Sega systems.

McDonald’s “Treasure Land Adventure” (1993)

McDonalds video game

Connoisseurs of fast food could get this Sega Genesis game to go with any meal (Happy or otherwise). Similar in play to Super Mario World and many other games, the graphics on this are surprisingly well developed for the era and price. This was one of several games McD’s has offered over the years.

7 Up “Cool Spot” (1994)

7up Spot video game

The mid ’90s were a golden age for anthropomorphic junk food stars and their related games. For that reason, 7 Up turned part of their logo into a radical red dot with sunglasses to appeal to the youth market, and inserted him into this surfing game for Sega, GameBoy and PC.

Chex Quest” (1996)

Chex Cereal video game

This video game is an important part of your nutritious breakfast. Here’s a first person shooter game that came as a prize in boxes of Chex cereals. It was based on the engine that ran the awesomely popular Doom video game, so the action rocked. But instead of killing Martians, players used their “Zorcher” to “teleport” “phlegm-based monsters” to “another realm.” It was PC based, but not to worry. If you don’t have a mid-90s Pentium machine laying around, you can still find it to play online.

Burger King “Big Bumpin’,” “Sneak King,” and “Pocket Bike Racer” (2006)

Burger King video game

Not to be outdone by McDonald’s, Burger King offered these Xbox games for a buck each with purchase of a combo meal. Big Bumpin’ was a bumper car game, too slow to be much fun. Sneak King required the scary rubber-headed King to present unsuspecting strangers with burgers (creepy, complicated and stupid). But the Pocket Bike Racer game was kinda entertaining, probably because it was based on the dynamics of existing racing games with new skins applied.

“Super Mario Spaghettios” (2012)

Mario Luigi Nintendo Spaghettios

Oh wait, this wasn’t a game… it was a can of pasta shaped like objects from Mario’s world. Never mind. But that would’ve been really cool.

Taco Bell “The Waiting Game” (2013)

Taco Bell Waiting video game

In the history of dull video games, this one was the most exciting. After Taco Bell introduced their first flavor of Doritos Locos Tacos to worldwide acclaim, it took them a loooong time to release the next variation. So, a month before the Cool Ranch Doritos flavor was to hit restaurants, these arcade games showed up at Canadian Taco Bell locations. Gameplay was based on the excruciating angst of that waiting period in the form of your character standing in line and gradually moving forward. Seriously. Your reward for finishing the intentionally dull 10-minute odyssey? A coupon for a free taco. To be redeemed later. Of course.

Levi’s “Skate-A-Rama” (2014)

Levis video game

Not a console or PC game, and not online either, this virtual reality game required players to perform real skateboard tricks on a stage coordinated with graphics projected behind them to score points. The ramps and rails are pretty basic, so the novelty wore off pretty quick. Levi’s set this up at trade shows to promote their skate wear line. Because, y’know… EXTREME!

Know of any others? Mention them in the comments below, and add them to the hobbyDB database if they aren’t already there!

This “Star Wars” Thing Might Turn Out to be Popular

Did you hear about the new “Star Wars” movie? No, not “The Force Awakens.” That’s soooo December of  2015.

But in December of 2016, “Rogue One,” a spin off of the “Star Wars” universe will land in cinemas, bringing the theatrical run of this franchise up to 8 films (or just 5 if you’re of a certain age and refuse to acknowledge the prequels).

star wars bb8 diorama

Either way, we found this BB-8 Diorama and some life size costumes at the 2016 Nuremburg Toy Fair. So it’s safe to say, the Force will be collectible for the forseeable future.

star wars rogue one costumes