Marvel Posts

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest Reveals Arrive on hobbyDB Database

Hasbro Pulse

With COVID still very much a concern, Hasbro turned towards the online convention route this April by playing host to its Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest.

The one-day event featured interactive brand panels, special guest appearances and behind-the-scenes content.

But the star of the day was close to 50 new reveals from lines such as Star Wars and Marvel, as well as classic favorites G.I. Joe, Power Rangers and Transformers.

All of which you can now find listed on hobbyDB!

Here’s a look at what’s arriving in stores throughout the year –

Star Wars: The Black Series

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

 

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

 

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

 

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

 

Marvel Legends Series (Build-A-Figure) (Ursa Major)

 

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

 

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

 

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

G.I. Joe Classified Series

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

 

Power Rangers: Lightning Collection

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Hasbro Pulse Fan Fest

Are you a fan of any of these franchises or Hasbro lines? Share your expertise with us by becoming a hobbyDB contributor, curator or more by messaging support@hobbydb.com.

Celebrating National Lego Day, hobbyDB Style

Legos

It’s National Lego Day and the crowd outside our office is already lined up for blocks!!

< crickets chirping >

Ahem.

Anyway. We’re honoring the annual celebration of all things Lego today from MiniFigs to BrickHeadz and all the tiny pieces that connect them to the forever expanding Lego universe.

Lego MovieFor millions of people, Legos are more than just those things that you step on with your bare feet in a dark living room in the middle of the night. For them, when it comes to the brand that made its debut in 1932, everything is awesome.

hobbyDB is home to close to 1,440 Lego items ranging from Books and Keychains to Clocks, Print Ads and Video Games. And, of course, Minifigs. Lots of minifigs.

For us at hobbyDB, we’re not just on a mission to document every Lego ever, we’re also builders ourselves.

Beckett, 9, shares her love for all things Star Wars and Marvel, including her 647-piece Stormtrooper helmet.

Legos

Nikolai, 13, used his keen eye to scratch-build this impressive Leopard II tank, the same one his father served on.

Lego

We can’t be the only ones having all the fun. We want to see your collection. Show us some of your favorite Lego builds in the comment below and perhaps we’ll use them for a future blog post.

Are you a Lego super collector? We’d like to show off your Lego collection as part of our Collector Showcase series. Let us know by messaging us at support@hobbydb.com.

Star Wars Legos

Add WandaVision and More to Your Collection via the Updated hobbyDB App

hobbydb app

It’s a fun day here at hobbyDB as we celebrate the release of our updated app, as well as the debut of Marvel’s “WandaVision.”

Version 1.2 of the hobbyDB app is now available in the App Store. The new version fixes a few bugs and performs some maintenance to pave the way for new features arriving in the near future.

WandaVisionThe app is a quick tool that allows you to scan an item while in Target or a thrift store — or if you’re home and looking to easily scan your new purchases into your collection.

For Marvel fans, we’ve added the UPC codes to Funko’s new “WandaVision” collection. With the app, you can simply scan the UPC code to add Halloween Wanda, the chase variant of 50s Vision or anything else easily to your collection.

Check out the entire WandaVision collection here.

And have no fear, an Android version is also in the works.

Have any questions or concerns? Let us know by messaging us at support@hobbydb.com.

From Marvel to Marbles to Mar-Vell to Ms.: The Crazy History of Captain Marvel

Captian Marvel

captain marvel

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

The early audience reviews for the new Captain Marvel film were not very good. In fact, they pretty much trashed the movie. The problem was, those reviews came out before the film was even released. It was a case of trolling fueled by… who even knows anymore? Something to do with the character suddenly being a woman, right? We live in weird times.

Once the movie finally hit theaters, critics and fans agreed it actually was pretty darn good and lots of fun. The retro ‘90s theme was a hit with audiences (just wait til Wonder Woman’s 1984 era movie comes out!), and Brie Larson nails the performance. So in the end, she triumphed.

captain marvelBut, come to think of it, when did Captain Marvel become a woman? Wasn’t she a guy in a live action TV show back in the ‘70s? He drove around the country in a Winnebago with a kid and guy who looked like a cross between Pat Morita and Stan Lee, right? Turns out this superhero has a way more convoluted backstory than you may have remembered.

captain marvelOf course it makes sense that Captain Marvel would have been created in 1967 by Stan Lee of…. wait for it… MARVEL Comics. Except, the character was actually named “Captain Mar-Vell” because the “Captain Marvel” name was already taken by another comic book publisher. A publisher that had been defunct for a decade and a half. Oh, and Captain Marvel was a man back then, so your memory is correct. Partly anyway.

See, there was an earlier character named “Captain Marvel” who appeared in various titles from Fawcett Comics from 1940 to 1953. That early date puts him right on par with the first superheroes, such as Batman, Superman, and Captain America, who debuted in the late 1930s and early ’40s. And that was the start of his problems.

captain marvel

Nothing at all similar between these two comics, right?

Fawcett unfortunately went out of business in 1953 after a copyright infringement suit involving the character. Not from Marvel, but from National Comics. Apparently they felt this caped, flying strongman was a little too similar to their character Superman. Wait, what? Yep, DC Comics was actually known as National Comics back then and sued over a character named after another comic book company that actually had yet to be named similarly to that character, but who subsequently named their new character after themselves. Did I mention this stuff is convoluted?

captain marvel hoppyBefore the lawsuit was settled, Fawcett really hunkered down on the character, creating Captain Marvel Jr., Mary Marvel, Uncle Marvel, Grandpa Marvel, and Hoppy the Marvel Bunny. (One of those characters I just made up. If you guessed Grandpa Marvel, you are correct. Yep, Hoppy actually existed. And I thought we were living in weird times today…)

Meanwhile, in 1953, issue #4 of MAD ran the story of Superduperman, featuring a nod to his lawsuit against Captain Marbles. MAD would of course eventually become part of the DC empire. (I am not making any of this up so far, aside from Grandpa Marvel. Seriously.)

captain marvelSpeaking of DC, they eventually acquired the rights to Fawcett’s Captain Marvel character and decided he had a lot of potential to expand the brand. Of course, with that name, he would be likely expanding the brand of their biggest competitor, so they gave him a new backstory and a catchy new title (but not a new name). The first issue of Shazam! was released by DC in 1973, complete with the subtitle, “The Original Captain Marvel.” So, naturally, there was another lawsuit. The producers of Gomer Pyle USMC sued over the “Shazam” catchphrase (okay, I made that up too, but honestly, at this point, it sounded believable, right?). No, of course it was Marvel Comics who sued DC over the name and the character. So the tagline was changed to “The World’s Mightiest Mortal.” And by the time it hit TV, people just kind of assumed that “Shazam” was the character’s name.

Got all that? Okay, back to Captain Marvel. The one from Marvel. The one named “Mar-Vell.” The one from the new movie. Yeah, her. Him. Let’s go back in time a bit… Captain Mar-Vell, a flying alien superhero from another planet (man, that sounds familiar), took off on his own in the late ’60s. Turns out he shared molecules with a kid named Rick Jones, and only one could exist in the world at a time, so they flip-flopped between the two identities. If that sounds familiar (it probably doesn’t but…) that was almost word for word the origin story of the original Fawcett character.

captain marvel

Ironically, while DC’s Shazam! was becoming popular with comic fans and TV viewers, readers didn’t really dig Marvel’s Marvel, so the character was killed off in the 1970s. And then revived several times since, as various male and female characters, most with the last name “Vell.” At one point he was resurrected long enough to die again in an explosion where his DNA was mixed with his cohort, USAF Officer Carol Danvers. So Danvers acquired super powers and of course became… Ms. Marvel. And then she eventually just took on the Captain Marvel name. At various times over the last couple of decades Ms./Captain Marvel has starred in her own standalone comics, made guest appearances in other stories, and has been part of the Avengers. So if you’ve been paying attention and weren’t confused by everything that happened before, all of this should make sense.

captain marvel

So yeah, now there’s a Captain Marvel movie, and the character is female, and it’s a pretty dang good movie, and you should see it despite what the trolls tried to tell you. And you’re going to love her cat Goose.

captain marvel

By the way, DC is releasing a Shazam! movie later this summer. It looks like a fun, goofy, good time at the cinema. No word on whether he’s called “Captain Marvel” anytime in the flick. Let’s hope not. That could get confusing.

Cartoonist, Writer, Collaborator: What I Learned From Stan Lee

Ron Ruelle

Ron Ruelle hobbyDB

The world of comics and pop culture in general lost a titan this week when Stan Lee, the biggest driving force behind Marvel Comics, died at the age of 95. His impact on comic book fans can’t be measured. Neither can his impact on comics creators.

Lee started with a company called Timely Comics in 1939, working mostly with largely forgotten kids fare. The publisher struck gold with their Captain America stories but didn’t do much to expand the concept. By the early 1960s, however, Timely rebranded as Marvel Comics and Lee was tapped to begin crafting a new world of allies for Cap, as well as competitors for DC’s superheroes who had been off and running (and flying and teleporting) for a couple of decades.

stan lee spideyHis first creation was The Fantastic Four, which was an immediate hit with readers. Within a few years, Hulk, Iron Man, and of course, his biggest success, Spider-Man were spinning tales of adventure of their own.

As a cartoonist myself, (insert shameless plug here), Stan Lee surprisingly wasn’t an early influence on me. See, my Grandmother worked for Western Publishing, whose Gold Key comic books included titles from Disney, Looney Tunes, DePatie-Freleng, and Walter Lantz. So that’s what I grew up on. They weren’t Marvel or DC comics, and aside from Super Goof, they didn’t include any superheroes. So I started drawing in the vein of those Gold Key titles. All by myself.

And there was Charles Schulz, whose “Peanuts” comic strip was in its creative heyday. Schulz famously said “If I were a better artist, I’d be a painter, and if I were a better writer, I’d write books — but I’m not, so I draw cartoons!” Made total sense to me. If I were ever going to make it in this business, I would probably have to go it alone. I gravitated towards becoming a newspaper comic strip artist, writing and drawing short, snappy jokes, often in the framework of a longer tale. But still a solo venture.

As I got a bit older and MAD magazine seemed less inappropriate (is MAD ever really appropriate at any age?), the idea of separate writers and artists began to appeal to me. But could someone really be a “cartoonist” if they only did one part of that equation? Did it matter if the end result was enjoyable to the reader?

stan lee marvel coversSo in a similar vein, I finally started to appreciate Stan Lee a bit later, in college, as I began collaborating with other creative types on class projects. Lee was primarily the writer of the ideas but was still considered still a “cartoonist” in the fullest sense. Would Jack Kirby or Steve Ditko have ever drawn those dynamic action panels of The Thing if Lee didn’t feed them the idea, the character, the inspiration? Would those ideas sear such vivid memories without their action-packed art?

stan lee hulk thingSuddenly, for me, the Charles Schulz approach had some competition as a way to do comics. If a solo cartoonist could crank out 7 pages a week, a writer and artist could crank out 14 together. Same amount of work for each, just divvied up differently. And a lot less lonely.

Stan Lee was supposed to be the keynote guest at the 2013 Denver Comic-Con but had to withdraw at the last minute. Fans were disappointed, and for many, this felt kind of urgent. It seemed like he was getting up there in years and might not be able to make it to a future Con, due to the inevitability of declining health or worse. We all wondered if we would ever get the chance to meet him.

But he came to Denver in 2016, and all was right with the world of superhero fandom.

I was at that Con, but didn’t get to meet him. As a cartoonist with a table full of books to sell, I couldn’t afford to step away for a few hours to stand in line for a photo, an autograph, and a brief word. As a cartoonist who was inspired by Lee, I regret missing the opportunity.

stan lee dccThese days, it almost feels like actual comic books are a by-product of the Marvel Entertainment machine. And yet comic book stores are full of fans and readers hotly debating the latest developments in new artists or writers being assigned to a particular title and whether a certain pairing worked well. Stan Lee probably would enjoy being there, watching comics being discussed as such important fare.